★ Origamic Architecture Instructions & Free Kirigami Templates ★


Architectural Origami Inspiration Roundup

Kirigami is the combination of origami and paper cutting crafts, and is a brilliant hobby to start because all you basically need is a craft knife and paper! Origamic architecture is the use of kirigami to create 3D buildings from a clever use of folds and cuts within just one single piece of paper.

Below you will find information for beginners to this art, as well as a number of free templates and projects for practice. Mainly I will focus on paper buildings constructed in a folded sheet, which means that this fascinating technique is also perfectly suited to using on pop-up greeting cards.

There are also links to awe-inspiring works by paper artists, as well as a number of photographs showing what you can achieve with only the seemingly simple acts of cutting and folding.

I hope you find this page interesting and useful 🙂

Kirigami Introduction

Architectural origami is the art of paper cutting to create 3D buildings – from just one sheet of paper! The designs range from the simple to the exceptionally intricate, and the subject matter can be anything from a whole city to a famous landmark or even your own house.

This page will focus on 90° pop-up buildings and detailed shapes, where the 3D design emerges and is fully visible when the paper is folded to an angle of 90 degrees. That means that this technique is well suited to making impressive pop-up cards as well – although you won’t be mass producing these for all your colleagues at Christmas (unless you start in January!)

Below you will find inspirational examples of origami artist’s work, advice for creating your own artwork, plus free online downloads. After saving the free templates to your computer, print them out and cut and fold along the lines. Usually, (but check first), the solid black lines are cut all of the way through, the red lines are mountain folds (the folded edges point upwards/towards you) and the blue lines are valley folds (where the folded edges point away from you).

If the lines are straight, use a steel ruler alongside your craft knife to get neat, perfectly straight cuts. For the folds, score lightly along the lines first to get a neat edge. Enjoy!

Top-Rated Kirigami Books

Probably the best source for any craft you wish to pursue is a book dedicated to the subject; all of the expert advice, instructions, inspiring examples, stunning photos, templates and project tutorials are all compiled in one place.

Looking at the diagram above, the gray block is the part that I want to stand vertical when the page is folded. To do this I need to place it on the ‘fold line’ so that the bottom edge of the shape is a certain distance underneath the fold line (distance = x). x is how far the gray shape will stand out (forward) from the page when the page is folded in half.

Once x is decided you will need to add strips above each horizontal edge of the gray shape, and the height of each of these strips must be x. This will make sure the gray shape stands vertically.

If you want the gray shape to be slanted, then you can either make the x’s below the fold line smaller than those above or vice versa. However you must keep all of the x’s above the fold line equal, otherwise it just won’t work.

Hope that’s clear!

NOTE: Every solid black line = where you cut through the paper. The other lines are fold lines.

* Gray block = the part that will be the stand-out shape. When the page has been folded in half and held at a 90 degree angle, this gray shape will stand vertically.

* x = both the distance between the page fold and the bottom edge of the main shape, and the distance between the top valley fold and the top hill folds on the main shape. This distance represents how far the main (gray) shape will stand out from the background.

* Solid black lines = where the paper must be cut. The other lines (red, blue and dashed) are fold lines.

The important thing to note in this design is that you can’t join a curved shape like you can a flat edge. This means the curved top in this shape will not be connected by a strip of paper to the background of the design, and so will be unsupported.

* Gray block = the shape which will stand vertically when the page has been folded (along the ‘page fold’ line) and held at a 90 degree angle.

* x = both the distance between the page fold and the bottom edge of the main shape, and the distance between the top valley folds and the top hill folds on the main gray shape. This x distance represents how far the main (gray) shape will stand out from the background and this must be equal for each of the 3 rectangle heights labelled in the diagram.

If all of the measurements labelled x weren’t equal, then it just wouldn’t work and everything would be wonky.

* Solid black lines = where the paper must be cut. The other lines (red, blue and dashed) are fold lines.

* Gray blocks = the pop-up shapes that you will see from the front. When the paper is folded in half and held at 90 degrees, these gray blocks will stand vertically. The larger gray block is the main pop-up shape, whilst the smaller gray block is the secondary pop-up shape.

* Solid black lines = where the paper must be cut with a craft knife. The red, blue and dashed lines represent fold lines.

* x = both the distance between the page fold and the bottom edge of the main shape, and the distance between the top valley fold and the top hill folds on the main shape. This distance represents how far the main (gray) shape will stand out from the background.

* y = the same principle as x but is referring to the secondary pop-up shape instead. y is both the distance between the bottom edges of the secondary and the main gray blocks, and the distance between the top valley fold and the top hill fold on the secondary shape. y represents the distance that the secondary block will stand out from the main block.

The diagram shows how to make a shape pop out of a larger pop-up shape.

* Gray blocks = the shape that will pop-up into a vertical position when the paper is folded in half (along the ‘page fold’) and held at 90 degrees. This is a castle design.

* Solid black lines = where the paper must be cut. The red, blue and dashed lines represent folds.

* x = both the distance between the page fold and the bottom edge of the main shape, and the distance between the top valley folds and the top hill folds on the main shape. This distance represents how far the main (gray) shape will stand out from the background.

If any of the distances marked as ‘x’ aren’t equal, then the pop-up will be wonky.

This diagram shows a vertical page fold rather than the horizontal page folds used in the previous diagrams. Same principle…just on it’s side! Tall building shapes – like skyscrapers – are best suited to the portrait layout.

* Gray blocks = the pop-up shape, which is a very simple building shape. The triangle at the top is unsupported on the sides.

* Solid black lines = where you need to cut the paper.

* Dashed line = where the page is folded, and red/blue lines represent folds.

This is a symmetrical shape, and once the cuts and folds are made, two boxes will be created; one large one at the bottom, and a thinner one on top with a triangle roof.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

error

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)

Follow by Email
LinkedIn
Share
Instagram